ADIA busts unregulated dental lab product myth

The perception—albeit entirely incorrect—held in some quarters of the dental community that dental laboratory products are unregulated is being corrected by the Australian Dental Industry Association.

“The regulatory standards for dental laboratory products are robust and provide high levels of patient safety,” ADIA CEO Troy Williams said.

“ADIA works with stakeholders from the dental community and government to raise awareness of, and compliance with, these regulatory standards.”

ADIA’s efforts to help the dental community better understand how dental laboratory products are regulated include a course that provides an overview of the regulatory standards that all manufacturers and importers must adhere to. It also introduces the role of the nation’s medical device regulator, the Therapeutic Goods Administration, in setting and enforcing the standards for dental laboratory products.

“This course is all about providing local manufacturers and importers with an understanding of what their obligations are when supplying dental laboratory products,” Williams said. “It goes a long way to debunking the myth that dental laboratory products in Australia are unregulated.”

The half-day course is being offered in Sydney on 30 August 2018 and in Melbourne on 11 October 2018. Registrations can be made via the ADIA website.

Based on a media release sourced from the ADIA website.

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1 Comment

  1. Any self congratulating news should be taken with a pinch of salt. Since dental technicians became a deregulated profession, there is no oversight or regulatory pressure on labs or clinics regarding dental appliances of any kind. In fact, I doubt there ever has been. Stating there is, is pure fiction. Anyone can import dental appliances from any lab in any part of the world, be it an under a staircase lab in Cambodia to a state of the art lab in the USA, you have hundreds of thousands of jobs flying in and out of Australia on any given day, there is no way to verify sources, materials or provenance of any sort to any significant extent. The logistics of verificaction of compliance to any rules, is simply impossible to handle, at least for now. Come up with a universal and internationally accepted mandatory barcode tracking system which includes all relevant info on the appliances, from patient ID, manufacturer ID, requesting dentist/clinic, brands and lot numbers of materials used and you may get somewhere in that regard.

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